Water Vessels

From OSE SRD

Seaworthy Vessels

Vessel Cost (gp) Cargo Capacity (Coins) Usage Length Beam Draft
Lifeboat 1,000 15,000 Any 20’ 4’–5’ 1’–2’
Longship 15,000 40,000 Any 60’–80’ 10’–15’ 2’–3’
Sailing ship (large) 20,000 300,000 Coastal waters, open seas 100’–150’ 25’–30’ 10’–12’
Sailing ship (small) 5,000 100,000 Coastal waters, open seas 60’–80’ 20’–30’ 5’–8’
Troop transport (large) 26,600 300,000 Coastal waters, open seas 100’–150’ 25’–30’ 10’–12’
Troop transport (small) 6,600 100,000 Coastal waters, open seas 60’–80’ 20’–30’ 5’–8’
Warship (large) 26,600 300,000 Coastal waters, open seas 100’–150’ 25’–30’ 10’–12’
Warship (small) 6,600 100,000 Coastal waters, open seas 60’–80’ 20’–30’ 5’–8’

Descriptions

Lifeboat: A small boat with a mast that folds down for storage. A small ship usually has 1–2 lifeboats, while larger ships may have 3–4. A lifeboat weighs 5,000 coins and reduces the cargo capacity of the ship on which it is carried by this much. A lifeboat is usually equipped with rations to feed ten human-sized beings for one week.

Longship: A narrow ship which may be used in rivers, coastal waters, or the open seas. A longship may be rowed or sailed, depending on the conditions. The crew typically fill the role of oarsmen, sailors, and fighters, as needed.

Sailing ship, large: A large, seaworthy vessel with up to three masts. Usually has multiple decks and raised “castles” at the bow and stern.

Sailing ship, small: A small, seaworthy vessel with a single mast.

Troop transport (large, small): These ships have similar dimensions and characteristics to normal sailing ships, but are specially designed to carry troops, mounts, and equipment of war as their cargo.

Warship (large, small): These ships have similar dimensions and characteristics to normal sailing ships, but are specially designed to carry mercenaries and war gear.


Unseaworthy Vessels

Vessel Cost (gp) Cargo Capacity (Coins) Usage Length Beam Draft
Boat (river) 4,000 30,000 Rivers, lakes 20’–30’ 10’ 2’–3’
Boat (sailing) 2,000 20,000 Lakes, coastal waters 20’–40’ 10’–15’ 2’–3’
Canoe 50 6,000 Rivers, swamps 15’ 3’ 1’
Galley (large) 30,000 40,000 Coastal waters 120’–150’ 15’–20’ 3’
Galley (small) 10,000 20,000 Coastal waters 60’–100’ 10’–15’ 2’–3’
Galley (war) 60,000 60,000 Coastal waters 120’–150’ 20’–30’ 4’–6’
Raft (makeshift) 50 per square foot Rivers, lakes Varies Varies ½’
Raft (professional) 1gp per square foot 100 per square foot Rivers, lakes Varies Varies ½’


Descriptions

Boat, river: Riverboats are either rowed or pushed with poles. The cost of the boat increases by 1,000gp if it has a roof (to protect passengers or cargo).

Boat, sailing: A small boat typically used for fishing in lakes or coastal waters.

Canoe: A small boat made of hide or canvas stretched over a wooden frame. Because of its small size and lightweight construction, a canoe may be carried by two people (weighing 500 coins).

Galley, large: A long ship with a shallow draft and a single, square-sailed mast.

Galley, small: A ship with a shallow draft and a single, square-sailed mast.

Galley, war: A large, specially constructed galley that is generally a fleet’s flagship. War galleys are always fitted with a ram (comes with the basic cost) and have a full deck above the rowers. They have two masts and 10’–20’ wide wooden towers rising 15’–20’ above the bow and stern.

Raft, makeshift: Given sufficient wood, characters may build a makeshift raft in 1–3 days per 10’ square section (up to a maximum size of 20’ × 30’).

Raft, professional: A professionally built raft has raised sides, a basic steering oar, and some form of shelter for goods or passengers. Such a raft may be up to 30’ × 40’. Professionally built rafts are sometimes floated downstream with cargo and then broken down and sold for the value of their wood (25cp per square foot).

Vessel Dimensions

A ship’s beam is its width and its draft is the depth it extends beneath the water.

Historical Periods

The vessels described in this section span various historical periods, from the ancient period to the medieval. Not all types of vessels may be available in a campaign setting.

Vessel Movement and Crew

Rowing (Oarsmen) Sailing (Sailors)
Vessel Requires Captain? Req. Crew Miles/Day Movement Rate Req. Crew Miles/Day Movement Rate
Boat (river) No 8 36 180’ (60’)
Boat (sailing) No 1 72 360’ (120’)
Canoe No 1** 18 90’ (60’)
Galley (large) Yes 180 18 90’ (90’) 20 72 360’ (120’)
Galley (small) Yes 60 18 90’ (90’) 10 90 450’ (150’)
Galley (war) Yes 300 12 60’ (60’) 30 72 360’ (120’)
Lifeboat No 1** 18 90’ (30’)
Longship Yes 60* 18 90’ (90’) 75* 90 450’ (150’)
Raft (makeshift) No 1** 12 60’ (30’)
Raft (professional) No 1** 12 60’ (30’)
Sailing ship (large) Yes 20 72 360’ (120’)
Sailing ship (small) Yes 10 90 450’ (150’)
Troop trans. (large) Yes 20 72 360’ (120’)
Troop trans. (small) Yes 10 90 450’ (150’)
Warship (large) Yes 20 72 360’ (120’)
Warship (small) Yes 10 90 450’ (150’)


Vessel Combat Stats

Vessel Maximum Mercenaries Armour Class Hull Points Ram? Catapults?
Boat (river) 8 [11] 20–40
Boat (sailing) 8 [11] 20–40
Canoe 9 [10] 5–10
Galley (large) 50 7 [12] 100–120 Can be added Up to 2
Galley (small) 20 8 [11] 80–100 Can be added Up to 2
Galley (war) 75 7 [12] 120–150 Built in Up to 3
Lifeboat 9 [10] 10–20
Longship 75* 8 [11] 60–80 Up to 1
Raft (makeshift) 9 [10] 5 per 10’ sq
Raft (professional) 9 [10] 5 per 10’ sq
Sailing ship (large) 7 [12] 120–180
Sailing ship (small) 8 [11] 60–90
Troop trans. (large) 100 7 [12] 160–240
Troop trans. (small) 50 8 [11] 80–120
Warship (large) 50 7 [12] 120–180 Up to 2
Warship (small) 25 8 [11] 60–90 Up to 1


Crew

Vessels are propelled by rowing or sailing, with some able to use either means. The necessary crew and the resulting speeds are given in the table above. The pay rates for crew are listed in Specialists.

Ship Modifications

The following modifications may be made to an existing ship:

  • Warship: A sailing ship may be converted into a warship or troop transport of the same size. The modification costs one-third of the ship’s original cost.
  • Catapult: A catapult may be added to a galley, longship, or warship.
  • Ram: A ram may be added to a large or small galley (a war galley already comes with a ram fitted).


Ship Weaponry

Item Cost (gp)
Catapult 100
Catapult shot 5
Catapult shot, pitch 25
Ram, large galley 10,000
Ram, small galley 3,000

Rams

Can be used against ships or giant sea monsters. Small individuals cannot be targeted.

Attack rolls: Are made using a THAC0 of 19 [0] and occur at the same point in the combat sequence as missile fire.

Attack modifiers: May be applied for weather conditions, manoeuvrability, etc.

Large or war galley: Deals 1d6+5 × 10 hull points damage against ships and 6d6 hit points damage against monsters.

Small galley: Deals 1d4+4 × 10 hull points damage against ships and 3d8 hit points damage against monsters.

Catapults

Fire either large rocks or flaming pitch.

Weight: A catapult plus twenty rounds of shot weighs 10,000 coins (subtracted from the ship’s cargo allowance).

Range: 150–300 yards.

Attack rolls and rate of fire: Depend on the number of crew manning the catapult:

  • 2 crew (minimum): Attacks with THAC0 19 [0]. Fires every 10 rounds.
  • 3 crew: Attacks with THAC0 19 [0]. Fires every 8 rounds.
  • 4 crew (maximum): Attacks with THAC0 17 [+2]. Fires every 5 rounds.

Attack modifiers: May be applied for weather conditions, manoeuvrability, etc.

Catapult Shot

Inflicts 3d6 hull damage against ships.

Catapult Shot, Pitch

Sets a 10’×10’ area of a ship on fire. The burning does 1d6 hull points of damage per turn (for at least one turn) and will spread to other areas of the ship if not extinguished. A fire may be put out by five crew in 3 turns, ten crew in 2 turns, or fifteen crew in 1 turn.